The Russian government is accusing the United States and its NATO allies of violating a treaty after the Pentagon deployed a new force in the tense Baltic region.

The deployment is the latest in a series of military moves involving the shifting of NATO forces to the Baltics as a means of thwarting any designs Moscow may have in the region. The Kremlin has vowed to respond in kind.

On Thursday, the Defense Department announced the arrival of the U.S. Army’s 2nd Cavalry Regiment in an outpost managed by Polish forces and which is located about 100 miles from Russia’s militarized region of Kaliningrad. The American forces are part of the Pentagon’s latest attempt to bolster allied nations against what they are perceiving as an escalating military threat from Russia. But it’s Moscow who has accused the U.S. and NATO allies of undermining Russian security by putting its forces so close to Russian borders.

“Vladimir Shamanov, head of the defense committee for Russia’s lower house of parliament, said Moscow would consider adding more nuclear-capable Iskander ballistic missiles on its side of the border to deter a U.S. military buildup in the region.

“This creates prerequisites that may eventually enable them to create a certain stronghold. We will surely not turn a blind eye on this. We will take retaliatory measures,” Shamanov said, according to the state-run Tass Russian news agency.

“Not just personnel but combat equipment. For instance, the group of Iskanders, including that in Kaliningrad, may be increased,” he added.

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