Russia deploying surface-to-air batteries to defend Arctic oil claims

The Russian military is increasing its footprint in the Arctic, now deploying anti-air batteries to defend its increasingly outsized claims on territory and natural resources.

An announcement by the Russian government noted that troops operating in Russia’s far north and the Arctic will be receiving the Tor-M2DT short-range anti-aircraft missile system.

The system includes radars and missile-launchers and can shoot down airplanes, helicopters, drones, and even incoming precision-guided munitions (PGMs) like cruise missiles.

“The Tor-M2DT autonomous short-range anti-aircraft missile system adapted to severe climatic conditions is intended to operate at extremely low temperature and difficult terrain,” the Kremlin statement said.

The Tor system is “specifically tailored for highly effective use against PGMs,” as Russia’s weapons-export agency has claimed.

Russia first revealed the Tor-M2DT alongside other Arctic-optimized weaponry at the May 2017 Victory Day parade in Moscow commemorating the end of World War II. [source]

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Jon E. Dougherty is a political, foreign policy and national security analyst and reporter with nearly 30 years of experience in both fields. A U.S. Army veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, he holds BA in Political Science from Ashford University and an MA in National Security Studies/Intelligence Analysis from American Military University.

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