UN Security Council imposes new sanctions on North Korea

The United Nations Security Council has ramped up sanctions against North Korea that include more substantial cuts in oil and other vital revenue-generating schemes.

In addition to curbing oil exports to the hermit regime, the new UNSC sanctions also call for countries to return North Korea expatriate workers to their country, as their incomes are seen as a major revenue source for the Pyongyang government.

The council voted unanimously for the new sanctions.

The U.N. resolution seeks to ban nearly 90 percent of refined petroleum exports to North Korea by capping them at 500,000 barrels a year and, in a last-minute change, demands the repatriation of North Koreans working abroad within 24 months, instead of 12 months as first proposed.

The U.S.-drafted resolution also caps crude oil supplies to North Korea at 4 million barrels a year and commits the Council to further reductions if it were to conduct another nuclear test or launch another ICBM.

“It sends the unambiguous message to Pyongyang that further defiance will invite further punishments and isolation,” Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said after the 15-0 vote. [source]

(Analyst comment: Just quickly, it doesn’t matter how many votes to impose sanctions or how ‘dire’ those sanctions are; at this point, only China’s full participation is required for these sanctions to work as advertised, and even then, that’s if the Russians and others end their black market sales of oil and other raw materials to the regime.)

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Jon E. Dougherty is a political, foreign policy and national security analyst and reporter with nearly 30 years of experience in both fields. A U.S. Army veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, he holds BA in Political Science from Ashford University and an MA in National Security Studies/Intelligence Analysis from American Military University.

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